CPA Exam Score Release

The National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) releases scores to candidates and the State Boards of Accountancy based upon the Uniform CPA Exam score release timetables. The score release timetables are updated biannually by The American Institute of Public Accountants (AICPA).

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We advise you to review the CPA Exam score release timetables when configuring your study plan and testing schedule, so that you are aware of when your scores will be released by NASBA to the State Boards of Accountancy after you sit for the CPA Exam.

CPA Exam Continuous Testing

NASBA, AICPA, and Prometric Testing Center announced today that Continuous Testing for the CPA Exam will be available to CPA Candidates starting July 1, 2020. This comes as great news for the many CPA candidates who have been requesting continuous testing for quite some time. Furthermore, this update helps relieve the recent gap in testing due to the COVID-19 virus. This transition from testing windows to Continuous Testing exemplifies the positive results of State Boards of Accountancy, NASBA, AICPA, and Prometric aligning as they continue to work towards helping CPA Candidates fulfill their journeys to becoming CPAs. 

According to NASBA, “Under the new Continuous Testing model, candidates will have the ability to take the Exam year-round, without restriction, other than waiting to receive scores from prior attempts of the same section or when there is a major change to the Exam. Continuous Testing will replace the existing CPA Exam Testing Window model, which only permits candidates to test during designated time frames each calendar quarter.”

All 55 U.S. Boards of Accountancy supported the move the CPA Exam to continuous testing because, “…it positions candidates to re-take sections while information is top of mind and may shorten the time needed to complete the four-section Exam.” NASBA will continue to work with the State Boards of Accountancy as a resource for helping with the transition in state legislation.

Stay tuned! There have been many updates lately in regards to testing, and we are dedicated to keeping you informed. However, if you have any specific questions about continuous testing, we recommend reaching out to NASBA directly.

 

Testing Window: July 1 – December 31, 2020

If you take your exam on/before:Your target score release date is:
July 23August 7
August 16August 25
September 8September 16
September 30October 9
October 23November 10
November 16November 24
December 8December 16
December 31January 12

*Testing dates and score release dates are created by AICPA and are subject to change. For the most up-to-date information, check the AICPA’s score release timetables.

How are Score Release Dates Determined?

Target release dates are estimated based on the following factors:

  • The day you took your exam
  • When the AICPA receives examination data files from Prometric Testing Center

Where Do I Find My CPA Exam Score?

If your State Board of Accountancy utilizes NASBA’s online score retrieval service, you will be able to receive your CPA Exam score on the NASBA Website the day that scores are released. Not all Boards use the online score retrieval service, so check with your State Board if you have any questions about where to find your CPA Exam score. If you don’t receive your CPA Exam in the timeframe outlined by the CPA Exam score release timetables, the AICPA asks all CPA Exam candidates to keep the following in mind:

  • Prometric sends AICPA the examination data files within 24 hours after the CPA candidate completes the exam. If your score for the exam is received after AICPA’s cutoff dates, your score will be available on the next scheduled score release date.
  • Your State Board of Accountancy may require at least one day beyond the published score release target date to process and release exam scores. Contact your State Board of Accountancy if you think your score has been wrongly delayed.
  • The Written Communication task of the BEC section requires additional analysis, so some CPA candidates may receive their BEC scores approximately one week following the targeted score release due date.
  • The AICPA does not provide CPA Exam scores. If you are unable to retrieve your CPA Exam score from the NASBA Website, please contact your State Board of Accountancy for further instruction.

What If I Want to Dispute my CPA Exam Score?

The CPA Exam isn’t perfect. Even with the AICPAs intensive psychometric analyses, regular content review, and other quality control measures, there remains a small potential for error in administering, executing, and scoring the exam. Because of this small potential for error, NASBA, Prometric and the AICPA provide candidates with two means to dispute their CPA Exam scores.

1. Score Review

The first method is a score review. If a candidate feels that their score does not accurately reflect their exam performance, they can request a review of their results through the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA). NASBA will submit a candidate request to the AICPA, which will then manually verify the correct grading of the candidates written communication and computational responses, and then verify their overall score. Keep in mind, though, that the scoring process involves several different quality control measures. This means that any score adjustments are exceedingly rare. 

We don’t recommend requesting a score review if you’re just looking for extra points. If you’ve scored a 74 on your FAR exam, for example, a score review is very unlikely to give you any additional points. Instead, you will pay fees, fill out paperwork, and wait for the results that might be disappointing.

2. Appeals

The second method to dispute a CPA Exam score is the Appeal process. This procedure offers candidates the chance to review their responses to incorrectly answered test questions or simulations. By reviewing the incorrect responses and the questions themselves, candidates can determine if they want to challenge the validity of one or more items on the CPA Exam. If the candidate decides to challenge an item, they should be prepared to defend their response as eloquently and thoroughly as possible.

To maintain the confidentiality of the CPA examination, viewing sessions may only take place in specifically authorized secure locations, and only while in the presence of a representative of the Board of Accountancy. Similar to the score review process, there are also fees, instructions and requirements that must be met. To find out if your state or jurisdiction allows appeals, or, for a list of instructions and requirements for the score review and appeals processes, contact your State Board of Accountancy, or NASBA.

Much like the score review process, candidates should be aware that the appeals process usually does not result in a score change. In most cases, simply moving on and preparing for the next section of the exam is the best bet. In any circumstance, candidates should not wait for the results of the score review or appeal before continuing their exams.

For the majority of UWorld Roger CPA Review students, the score review and appeal options are unnecessary. Our comprehensive CPA Exam courses are designed to help students pass the first time. Most of our students find that a failing score simply represents the need for harder work and greater discipline, rather than an error on the part of the AICPA, NASBA or Prometric.

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CPA Exam Release Dates Q&A

The National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) releases scores to candidates and the State Boards of Accountancy based upon the Uniform CPA Exam score release timetables. The score release timetables are updated biannually by The American Institute of Public Accountants (AICPA) and first posted on AICPA Insights and on AICPA’s Website. NASBA posts scores 48 hours from when they start receiving scores.

If your State Board of Accountancy utilizes NASBA’s online score retrieval service, you will be able to receive your CPA Exam score on the NASBA Website the day that scores are released. Not all Boards use the online score retrieval service, so check with your State Board if you have any questions about where to find your CPA Exam score. For those CPA Candidates living in California, Illinois, or Maryland, please check with your State Board of Accuntancy to retrieve your CPA Exam scores.

The advisory score is the first score you will receive on score release day, but it isn’t your official CPA Exam score. Once the advisory scores are released by the AICPA, NASBA receives them and processes them by matching the scores to exam takers identifiers. Then, as the scores are verified by NASBA, they are sent to the State Boards of Accountancy for approval and released officially to the CPA Candidates.

We recommend printing your Score Notice to keep for future reference because the scores are only available for a set amount of time.

If you did not pass a section of the CPA Exam, you will receive a CPA Candidate Performance Report. The Performance Report shows how you performed overall and in each of the CPA Exam content areas. Remember that this report is for informational purposes only and does not affect your official CPA Exam score.

To find the report, check the eye icon to the right of your advisory score, once it has been released. Clicking on the eye icon will navigate you to your Candidate Performance Report. We recommend printing your Candidate Performance Report to keep for future reference.